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Intimacy After Baby

Intimacy After Baby

Article courtesy of guest blogger, Emily Graham. Emily is the creator of Mighty Moms. She believes being a mom is one of the hardest jobs around and wanted to create a support system for moms from all walks of life. On her site, she offers a wide range of info tailored for busy moms -- from how to reduce stress to creative ways to spend time together as a family.    It’s certainly not uncommon for new moms to have anxiety about having sex after the birth of their child. Many women are hit with a variety of concerns they may not have felt prepared to handle: from feeling over-touched, uncomfortable in their postpartum bodies or hesitant due to the potential for pain. Read on for tips on how to work through the issues that can hinder romantic intimacy after the birth of a child.  Breastfeeding and Your Sex Drive The decision to breastfeed your baby is one factor that can affect your sex drive. According to a recent study, women who breastfed were more likely to delay a return to...

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Just What Is Brainspotting?

Just What Is Brainspotting?

By Dana Stewart As a therapist I am often thinking about the impact of trauma on people's lives. Many people believe that trauma only refers to very large scale events, like a major car accident, sexual assault, the death of a loved one, or war. But trauma is different for everyone, and sometimes trauma happens in very subtle ways. A trauma can be any action or event that causes a pervasive negative psychological and physiological reaction, such as being bullied or teased at school, losing a treasured job, or being diagnosed with an unexpected illness. It's important to remember that one person experiences as traumatic, might not feel traumatic to another person, so it can be easy to dismiss some of the traumatic events in our lives as "no big deal", when in all actuality, they caused a lot of pain. And even once an event has long based, the memory of that trauma can be stored and experienced in the body in ways that we may not recognize or cognitively understand. This trauma can...

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How Gottman Couples Counseling Can Improve Your Relationship

How Gottman Couples Counseling Can Improve Your Relationship

By Shelley Leutschaft Let’s face it, adulting and relationships can be some of the most labor-intensive, emotionally compelling, and difficult ‘work’ we engage in with others. Our interpersonal coupled relationships are no exception. The decision to participate in couples counseling requires courage. It isn’t easy to acknowledge things could be better, and the unfamiliarity of counseling can cause you to hesitate with moving forward. Apprehension or frustration can be created when you begin the process of coordinating everything necessary–from navigating insurance and the financial aspects of participating in counseling, juggling individual and family schedules, to finding a provider, can seem too much at times. Even so, you may hesitate, wondering if what you are experiencing is really that big of a deal or worse yet, can counseling even help. Motivation to act can be impacted by many things and many couples become stalled in the processes that occur before the actual counseling...

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Step Outside Your Thoughts

Step Outside Your Thoughts

By Andrea Scharlatt As a Minnesotan, you probably already have some connection to the outdoors. It is hard to live in the Land of 10,000 Lakes and not have a favorite outdoor destination. That said, it is far too easy to get caught up in the daily grind and forget about the importance of connecting with something greater than ourselves. With more and more of the world's population living in urban settings, it is important for people to find time to connect with nature when and where they can. One study showed that people who live in urban areas actually have a 20% higher risk of developing an anxiety disorder and a 40% greater risk of developing a mood disorder when compared to individuals living in rural areas. Being in nature has been shown to reduce feelings of anger, fear, and stress while increasing pleasant feelings in the body. Being in nature may not only makes you feel better emotionally, but in can also improve your physical wellbeing by reducing stress, blood pressure,...

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Put your own oxygen mask on first!

Put your own oxygen mask on first!

By Heather Deveny-Leggitt When reviewing safety procedures on an airplane, the flight attendant always reminds passengers to put on their own oxygen mask before securing others. This is a helpful metaphor for parenting. Our best intentions often tell us that we need to put our children first, even to the detriment of our own well being. However, as we deal with daily stress and spread ourselves too thin, or when we try to ignore our own feelings in order to manage our children’s, we often get in the way of our own self-care. When stress takes over, or when we fail to acknowledge and care for our own feelings, we downshift to the lower centers of our brain. You may find yourself parenting in ways you thought you never would, even when you know it’s not effective and later feel guilty. In order to access the high centers of our brain, we have to first calm our own minds and bodies before we can effectively calm our children. We can do this by implementing both long-term and short-term...

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